The homegrown terrorist’s name is Jared Lougher. He killed 6 people, wounded 13 more.
Including the attempted assassination of an United States Congresswoman.
And the assassination of a federal Judge.

Here are the stories of those that he murdered in cold blood. This post will be updated.

Christina Taylor Greene.

Greene is one of six killed in front of a Safeway grocery store while awaiting to talk to Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords who had set up a townhall-style meet and greet event. Five people died at the scene. Greene died at a local hospital.

Greene’s family says she was vibrant, excited about life, and she was the “best daughter in the world.”

Born September 11, 2001, Greene was excited about the political process, was on the student government, and went to the Giffords event Saturday to learn more about the political process, family members say.

Greene attended Mesa Verde Elementary School. She was the only girl on the Canyon Del Oro baseball team. She loved the sport, as well as horseback riding and swimming. She wanted to be a veterinarian.


- U.S. District Judge John Roll, 63

U.S. District Judge John Roll was no stranger to violence.

Killed during the massacre in Arizona that left five others dead and more than a dozen injured, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, the 63-year-old was the victim of hundreds of death threats nearly two years ago.

Roll had served as the chief judge for the U.S. District for Arizona since 2006 and was appointed to the federal bench by President George H.W. Bush in 1991.

In 2009, he received death threats while presiding over a case in which illegal immigrants were suing an Arizona rancher.

Roll and his family received menacing calls at their home, and people angry about the case posted his personal information online, The Arizona Republic reported.

“They cursed him out, threatened to kill his family, said they’d come and take care of him. They really wanted him dead,” a law enforcement official told The Washington Post in May 2009.

During that time, he and his wife were placed under 24-hour protection and U.S. marshals guarded his home and escorted him to and from work for about a month.
Roll told the Post in May 2009 that “any judge who goes through this knows it’s a stressful situation” and that his family was grateful for the protection.

Four men were eventually identified as the key threat makers, but Roll declined to press charges after discussing it with the marshals, the Republic reported.

At the time of his death, Roll was presiding over a federal court challenge to ban ethnic studies in a school district in Tuscon.

A Pennsylvania native who went to the University of Arizona for both his undergraduate and law degrees, Roll was described by friends and colleagues as a courteous man and a serious, prudent judge.

“He knew the law backward and forward. He was a scholar of the law,” Judge Stephen McNamee, who preceded Roll as chief judge, told the Arizona Republic. “He was just kind and respectful to everyone.”

Judge Mary Murguia, a former Arizona district judge who was recently appointed to the federal bench, told the paper that Roll was a “man of great integrity.”

Roll told the Post in May 2009 that “any judge who goes through this knows it’s a stressful situation” and that his family was grateful for the protection.

Four men were eventually identified as the key threat makers, but Roll declined to press charges after discussing it with the marshals, the Republic reported.

At the time of his death, Roll was presiding over a federal court challenge to ban ethnic studies in a school district in Tuscon.

A Pennsylvania native who went to the University of Arizona for both his undergraduate and law degrees, Roll was described by friends and colleagues as a courteous man and a serious, prudent judge.

“He knew the law backward and forward. He was a scholar of the law,” Judge Stephen McNamee, who preceded Roll as chief judge, told the Arizona Republic. “He was just kind and respectful to everyone.”

Judge Mary Murguia, a former Arizona district judge who was recently appointed to the federal bench, told the paper that Roll was a “man of great integrity.”

- Gabe Zimmerman, 30, Giffords’ director of community outreach.

Gabe Zimmerman, a member of Congress who was killed in mass shooting in Arizona on Saturday, was known as friendly and dedicated assistant who was with Rep. Gabrielle Giffords from the earliest point in her career Congress.

Zimmerman was 30 years old, and had worked for Giffords since 2007.

His work has been the director of public position, which led him to organize the Congress in the Corner “event, which quickly transformed from run of the mill city hall to the national tragedy in which six people were killed, including Zimmerman and Giffords was shot in the head.

Zimmerman remembered by friends and colleagues on Saturday night, as a friendly, dedicated and good humor.

He was engaged to be married, according to media reports, and served as the primary point of contact for the congressman since 2007.

Zimmerman, who works out of Tucson office of the congressman, was known by local interest groups for going above and beyond the call of duty.

Dorwin Stoddard, 76, a pastor at Mountain Ave. Church of Christ.

Dorwan and Mavanell Stoddard visited 28 countries and all 50 states during their annual summer trips.

Saturday, the Tucson retirees traveled just one mile from their northwest-side home to meet Rep. Gabrielle Giffords at a “Congress on Your Corner” event outside a Safeway supermarket.

They were standing in line when a gunman, later identified as 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner, reportedly began shooting a semiautomatic weapon.

Dorwan Stoddard, a church volunteer known for his ability to fix things, was among the six dead, his friends and pastor confirmed Saturday night. Mavanell was shot in the legs but is expected to recover. The couple, believed to be in their mid-70s, were among the victims taken to University Medical Center.

Mike Nowak, the Stoddards’ minister at Mountain Avenue Church of Christ, described the couple as generous and church-minded.

Dorwan Stoddard performed maintenance at the church and organized the benevolence committee, a group that reached out to the less-fortunate, Nowak said. A former construction worker, he liked working with his hands.

“He always gave of himself and never asked for anything in return,” Nowak said.

Mavanell, who went by “Mavy”, was at his side for weekly services.

Those closest to the Stoddards struggled Saturday with the news. Dorwan and Mavy were sweethearts at Amphitheater High School, friends said, who reconnected 15 years ago after their spouses died. Friends said both had several adult children from their first marriages.

They married in Las Vegas and were avid travelers, leaving Tucson every April, just as the weather got hot, and returning in October.

The Stoddards often went with friends Burl and Frankie Williams to their cabin in Pinetop; there, the couples fished and played dominoes and cards in the cool weather.

“They were our special friends,” Frankie Williams said.

The Stoddards were among the first people to visit Frankie, 85, when she underwent hip surgery last month.

“They were in our house three days ago,” she said. “This is such a tragedy for us to think about our personal friends at the wrong place at the wrong time. They were hit by a gunman not because they were enemies of his, but because it was just one of those sad things.”

Williams said she’s confident that Mavanell will recover.

“She’s a very strong person,” she said. “With the help of those of us who love her, she’ll get through it.”

Nowak, the Stoddards’ pastor, said he’s struggling to explain how two of his most dedicated worshippers ended up in the middle of a shooting spree.

“You can’t,” he said. “We live in a world that is full of crime, full of hatred. You can ask yourself the question ‘Why?’ but there’s never an answer when it hits so close to home.”

- Dorthy Murray, 76.

- Phyllis Scheck, 79.

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